This method generates a plot showing the number of genomic positions reaching a certain read depth. This method receives either a single CoverageBamFile object or a list of CoverageBamFile objects and generates a plot for which the X-axis represents a range of coverage read depths and the Y-axis corresponds to the number of megabases having a specific read coverage value. If a list of CoverageBamFile objects is passed to the function then it will generate a different coloured line for each of the objects.

For more information on customizing the embed code, read Embedding Snippets. CoverageView Coverage visualization package for R. Man pages API Source code S4 method for signature 'CoverageBamFile' genome. Related to genome. CoverageView index. Package overview Easy visualization of the read coverage. R Package Documentation rdrr. We want your feedback! Note that we can't provide technical support on individual packages. You should contact the package authors for that.

Tweet to rdrrHQ. GitHub issue tracker. Personal blog. What can we improve? The page or its content looks wrong. I can't find what I'm looking for. I have a suggestion. Extra info optional. Embedding an R snippet on your website. Add the following code to your website.Sample Set: the following transforms the iris data set into a ggplot2-friendly format. Calculate mean values for aggregates given by Species column in iris data set.

Calculate standard deviations for aggregates given by Species column in iris data set. To enforce that the bars are plotted in the order specified in the input data, one can instruct ggplot to do so by turning the corresponding column here Species into an ordered factor as follows. In the above example this is not necessary since ggplot uses this order already.

ggplot coverage plot

Overview 2. R Package Repositories 3. Installation of R Packages 4. Getting Around 5. Basic Syntax 6. Data Types 7. Data Objects 8. Important Utilities 9. Operators and Calculations Reading and Writing External Data Useful R Functions SQLite Databases Graphics in R Analysis Routine R Markdown This R tutorial describes how to create a barplot using R software and ggplot2 package.

Data derived from ToothGrowth data sets are used. In this case, the height of the bar represents the count of cases in each category. Barplot outline colors can be automatically controlled by the levels of the variable dose :.

ggplot coverage plot

Read more on ggplot2 colors here : ggplot2 colors. In the R code below, barplot fill colors are automatically controlled by the levels of dose :. The allowed values for the arguments legend.

Read more on ggplot legend : ggplot2 legend. ToothGrowth describes the effect of Vitamin C on tooth growth in Guinea pigs. Three dose levels of Vitamin C 0. A stacked barplot is created by default. The barplot fill color is controlled by the levels of dose :. If you want to place the labels at the middle of bars, you have to modify the cumulative sum as follow :. If the variable on x-axis is numeric, it can be useful to treat it as a continuous or a factor variable depending on what you want to do :.

The helper function below will be used to calculate the mean and the standard deviation, for the variable of interest, in each group :.

ggplot coverage plot

This analysis has been performed using R software ver. Basic barplots Data Create barplots Bar plot with labels Barplot of counts Change barplot colors by groups Change outline colors Change fill colors Change the legend position Change the order of items in the legend Barplot with multiple groups Data Create barplots Add labels Barplot with a numeric x-axis Barplot with error bars Customized barplots Infos.

Basic barplots Data Data derived from ToothGrowth data sets are used. To make a barplot of counts, we will use the mtcars data sets : head mtcars mpg cyl disp hp drat wt qsec vs am gear carb Mazda RX4 Change the legend position Change bar fill colors to blues p The allowed values for the arguments legend. Barplot with multiple groups Data Data derived from ToothGrowth data sets are used. Create barplots A stacked barplot is created by default.

Barplot with a numeric x-axis If the variable on x-axis is numeric, it can be useful to treat it as a continuous or a factor variable depending on what you want to do : Create some data df2 supp dose len 1 VC 0.Commonly when a sample has undergone sequencing you will want to know the sequencing depth achieved in order to get an idea of the data quality.

The covBars function from the GenVisR package is designed to help in visualizing this sort of data by constructing a color ramp of cumulative coverage. The covBars function takes as input a matrix with rows representing the sequencing depth, columns representing samples, and matrix values representing the number of reads meeting that criteria for a given cell. The best way to begin constructing this data is with the command line tool samtools depth for anything other than whole genome sequencing data in which case picards CollectWgsMetrics program might be a better choice.

The output from samtools depth for 4 capture samples from the adult B-lymphoblastic leukemia manuscript linked above is available on genomedata. The command used to create this file was samtools depth -q 20 -Q 20 -b roi.

Within the samtools depth command we used the parameters -q 20 and -Q 20 to set a minimum base and mapping quality respectively. Essentially this means that a read will not be counted if these criteria are not met. We used -b roi. We used -d to ensure pileups are not stopped until 12, reads are reached for that coordinate. Finally we specified the four bam files for which we want to create pileups for, each bam file has been indexed with samtools index.

The first thing we need to do loop over all columns of seqData and obtain a tally of read pileups for each coverage value, this can be done with a call to apply using the plyr function count. Strictly for readability we then create our own function called renameCol with the purpose of renaming the columns names to a more human readable format and use lapply to apply the function to each data frame in our list.

You might notice that each data frame in seqCovList has a differing number of rows. This has occurred because not every sample will have pileups for the same coverage values, this is especially true when getting into higher coverage depths owing to outliers.

We will fix this by creating a framework data frame containing all possible coverage values, from the min to the max observed from each data frame in the list seqCovList. For this we use lapply to apply max to each coverage column within the data frames in seqCovList using an anonymous function within the lapply.

This will return a list of the maximum coverage value for each data frame so we use unlist to coerce the list to a vector and use max again to find the overall maximum coverage observed.

A similar procedure is perormed to obtain the minimum coverage and we create are framework data frame using these maximum and minimum values with data.

Now that we have our framework data frame we can use merge and lapply to perform a natural join between the the framework data frame covFramework and each data frame containg the acutal read pileups for each coverage in seqCovList. From there we can use Reduce to recursively apply merge to our previous list of data frames seqCovListwhich effectively merges all data frames in this list.

Our data is now in a format covBars can accept but we have to do some minor cleanup. The merges we performed introduce NA values for those cells which had no coverage pileups, we convert these cell values from NA to 0.

We then remove the coverage column from the data frame as that information is defined in the row names, convert the data frame to a matrix, and add in column names. Now that we have our matrix we can simply call covBars on the resulting object.

ggplot, Visualization in R: from basics to advanced plots

The output looks significantly different from the manuscript version though so what exactly is going on? If we look closely at the manuscript figure we can see that the scale is actually limited to a coverage depth of 1, This ceilings the outliers in the data and puts everything on an easily interpretable scale.

The previous function returns a vector, we convert this to a matrix with the appropriate row name From there we subset our original matrix up to a coverage of 1,X and use rbind to add in the final row corresponding to a coverage of 1,X.How to add ideogram track.

Prepare the data

How to add gene model track. How to add reference track 3. How to add track from bam files to visualize coverage and mismatch summary. How to add track for vcf file to visualize variants. OrganismDb object : recommended, support gene symbols and other combination of columns as label. To make a gene model from GRangesList object, see the vignette of ggbio package. OrganismDb object has a simpler API to retrieve data from different annotation resources, so we could label our transcripts in different ways.

Different arguments to change colors : label. To add a reference track, we need to load a BSgenome object from the annotation package. You can choose to plot the sequence as text, rect, segment. RSamtools package is required. The following code is just an example to create a bam object.

This bam object can be used in autoplot function. To show mismatch proportion, you have to provide reference sequence, the mismatched proportion is color coded in the bar chart. You could zoom in and zoom out, or go through view chunks one by one. Overview is a good way to show all events at the same time, give overall summary statistics for the whole genome.

In this chapter, we will introduce three different layouts that are used a lots in genomic data visualization. All the raw data processed and stored in GRanges ready for use, you can simply load the sample data from biovizBase. Many other examples are available in the ggbio package vignette.

Building your first track Add ideogram track : Plot single chromosome with cytoband Add gene model track Add a reference track Add an alignement track Add a variants track : vizualize vcf file Building your tracks Simple navigation Overview plots Circular plots Footnotes Licence. How to add track for vcf file to visualize variants Add ideogram track : Plot single chromosome with cytoband hg19, hg18, mm10, mm9 as been built inside, so you don't have download it on the fly.

Gene model from OrganismDb object OrganismDb object has a simpler API to retrieve data from different annotation resources, so we could label our transcripts in different ways. Gene model from TranscriptDb object TranscriptDb doesn't contain any gene symbol information, so we use tx id as default for label.

Add a reference track To add a reference track, we need to load a BSgenome object from the annotation package. You can pass a zoom in factor into zoom function, if it's over 1 it's zooming out, if it's smaller than 1 it's zooming in. Add an alignement track Create a bam object RSamtools package is required. This bam object can be used in autoplot function bam. Visualize bam file ggbio supports visualization of alignments file stored in bam, autoplot method accepts : bam file path indexed BamFile object It's simple to just pass a file path to autoplot function, you can stream a chunk of region by providing 'which' parameter.

Otherwise please use method 'estiamte' to show overall estiamted coverage. Mismatch proportion To show mismatch proportion, you have to provide reference sequence, the mismatched proportion is color coded in the bar chart. View all coverage distribution autoplot fl. Add a variants track : vizualize vcf file This track is supported by semantic zoom.This R tutorial describes how to create a density plot using R software and ggplot2 package.

Read more on ggplot2 line types : ggplot2 line types. Read more on ggplot2 colors here : ggplot2 colors. The allowed values for the arguments legend. Read more on ggplot legends : ggplot2 legends. Read more on facets : ggplot2 facets. This analysis has been performed using R software ver.

Prepare the data

Prepare the data Basic density plots Change density plot line types and colors Change density plot colors by groups Calculate the mean of each group : Change line colors Change fill colors Change the legend position Combine histogram and density plots Use facets Customized density plots Infos.

Prepare the data This data will be used for the examples below : set. Basic density plots library ggplot2 Basic density p. Change density plot colors by groups Calculate the mean of each group : library plyr mu sex grp. Use facets Split the plot in multiple panels : p Read more on facets : ggplot2 facets.

Infos This analysis has been performed using R software ver. Enjoyed this article? Show me some love with the like buttons below Thank you and please don't forget to share and comment below!!

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ggplot coverage plot

Network Analysis and Visualization in R. More books on R and data science.A basic installation of R provides an entire set of tools for plotting, and there are many libraries available for installation that extend or supplement this core set.

The ggplot2 package is not the most powerful or flexible—the graphics provided by default with R may take that title.

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Neither is ggplot2 the easiest—simpler programs like Microsoft Excel are much easier to use. What ggplot2 provides is a remarkable balance of power and ease of use. As a bonus, the results are usually professional looking with little tweaking, and the integration into R makes data visualization a natural extension of data analysis.

Although this chapter focuses on the ggplot2 package, it is worth having at least passing familiarity with some of the basic plotting tools included with R. First, how plots are generated depends on whether we are running R through a graphical user interface like RStudio or on the command line via the interactive R console or executable script. Although writing a noninteractive program for producing plots might seem counterintuitive, it is beneficial as a written record of how the plot was produced for future reference.

Further, plotting is often the end result of a complex analysis, so it makes sense to think of graphical output much like any other program output that needs to be reproducible. When working with a graphical interface like RStudio, plots are by default shown in a pop-up window or in a special plotting panel for review.

Alternatively, or if we are producing plots via a remote command line login, each plot will be saved to a PDF file called Rplots.

The name of this file can be changed by calling the pdf function, giving a file name to write to. To finish writing the PDF file, a call to dev. Like histplot is a generic function that determines what the plot should look like on the basis of class attributes of the data given to it.

For example, given two numeric vectors of equal length, it produces a dotplot. For the rest of this chapter, the pdf and dev. For basic vector plotting like the above, plot respects the order in which the data appear.

We would have had to sort one or both input vectors to get something more reasonable, if that makes sense for the data. Other plotting functions like histcurveand boxplot can be used to produce other plot types. A plot like this will only look reasonable if the axes ranges are appropriate for both layers, which we must ensure ourselves. There are a number of hidden rules here. There are many individual plotting functions like plot and histand each takes dozens of parameters with names like "las""cex""pch"and "tck" these control the orientation of y -axis labels, font size, dot shapes, and tick-mark size, respectively.

Unfortunately, the documentation of all of these functions and parameters oscillates between sparse and confusingly complex, though there are a number of books dedicated solely to the topic of plotting in R.

Despite its complexities, one of the premier benefits of using plot is that, as a generic, the plotted output is often customized for the type of input. There are several ways of interacting with ggplot2 of various complexity. Unlike the generic plot function, which can plot many different types of data such as in the linear model example aboveggplot2 specializes in plotting data stored in data frames.

When installed with install. Each row of this data frame specifies some information about a single diamond; with about 54, rows and many types of columns including numeric and categoricalit is an excellent data set with which to explore plotting.

For the mapping of aesthetics, there is an internal call to an aes function that describes how aesthetics of the geoms x and yand color in this case relate to columns of the stat -adjusted data in this case, the output columns from the stat are identical to the input columns. To save the result to a file or when not working in a graphical interface, we can use the pdf function before the call to plot followed by dev.

Alternatively, we can use the specialized ggsave function, which also allows us to specify the overall size of the plot in inches at dpi by default for PDFs. Note that the order of the layers matters: the second layer was plotted on top of the first. This second layer illustrates one of the more confusing aspects of ggplot2namely, that aesthetic mappings properties of geoms and stat mappings interact. As a consequence, the underlying data representing carat and price were modified by the stat, and the stat knew which variables to smooth on the basis of this aesthetic mapping.

The "bin" stat checks the x aesthetic mapping to determine which column to bin into discrete counts, and also creates some entirely new columns in the stat-transformed data, including one called. The extra dots indicate to the user that the column produced by the stat is novel. The result of plotting the above is shown below on the left.


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